Fonds F-290 - All Hallows' School (Yale, B.C.) fonds

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Title and statement of responsibility area

Title proper

All Hallows' School (Yale, B.C.) fonds

General material designation

  • Textual record

Parallel title

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Title notes

Level of description

Fonds

Reference code

AADNW F-290

Edition area

Edition statement

Edition statement of responsibility

Class of material specific details area

Statement of scale (cartographic)

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Statement of scale (architectural)

Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

Dates of creation area

Date(s)

  • 1899-1920 (Creation)
    Creator
    All Hallows' School (Yale, B.C.)

Physical description area

Physical description

7.5 cm of textual records

Publisher's series area

Title proper of publisher's series

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Archival description area

Name of creator

(1885-1920)

Administrative history

All Hallows began in 1854 at Shipmeadow, England, as a penitentiary designed to look after what were known as "fallen women". An active religious community of Sisters was formed at All Hallows to run a hospital, a school for girls, as well as to look after visitors coming there for a time of retreat from the affairs of the world. The Sisters moved to Ditchingam, Norfolk and built themselves a monastery in which to live and work. In 1881 Bishop Sillitoe sent out a call to England for assistance in his work with the native Indian population. The response came from All Hallows community in Ditchingam. Three sisters arrived in Yale in 1884, using the parsonage adjoining St. John's Church as a school for Indian girls. The year after they moved the school into the abandoned C.P.R. hospital. Following negotiations initiated by Bishop Sillitoe, a new school was built in 1888. Given the high quality of the education prevailing in the school, families in New Westminster and other parts of B.C., where at that time no advanced educational facilities existed, began to seek admission for their daughters. In 1890, another wing was added to take care of the white girl's needs. Further additions were made in 1908 and 1909, the peak years of the school's history. The fee for entrance into the white girl's part of the school was $5, with board and education costing $30 a month; piano instruction was $5; violin and painting $5 a month. The school possessed spacious playing grounds, with two tennis courts, a basketball court, hockey and croquet grounds. Sister Amy occupied the position of Sister Superior for many years. She was followed by sister Constance and others, including Sister Althea, Agatha, Alice, and Marion. Sisters of All Hallows planned also to replace the Ondernok chapel, that had been build as a stable, with a new chapel built of stone. A fund of $5000 was raised for this purpose, but the school closed its doors in 1916, before enough money was raised. The money was used later to equip the chapel at St. George's Indian School at Lytton, and lift the mortgage from the Japanese Mission in Vancouver. The Sisters returned to England in 1920.

Custodial history

Scope and content

Fonds consists of Baptism register (1902-1920); service register (1914-1920); student records of Indian girls (1910-1922, photocopy); handwritten letters, notes and lists of registered pupils; and printed material. Includes also printed copies of "All Hallows in the West", a school triennial publication (1899, 1907, 1908, 1919). The Student register of Indian girls includes also names of students admitted at Spuzzum and at St. George's Indian Residential School, Lytton.

Notes area

Physical condition

Immediate source of acquisition

Arrangement

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Script of material

Location of originals

Availability of other formats

Original student records at St. George's Indian Residential School as noted in accession register (now in Diocese of Cariboo Archives?).

Restrictions on access

Terms governing use, reproduction, and publication

Finding aids

Guide #:

Associated materials

See also St. George's Indian Residential School in the Archives of the Diocese of Cariboo.

Related materials

Accruals

General note

Title based on fonds contents and name as appears on publications issued by body.
Data entry data: 30/05/1997 13:54

Alpha-numeric designations

Inmagic identifier: 1688

Alternative identifier(s)

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Description record identifier

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Level of detail

Dates of creation, revision and deletion

Jan. 11, 2000 DJS

Language of description

Script of description

Sources

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Accession area

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Physical storage

  • Box: D96a
  • Box: Box D96a